Is it Time to Buy a Horse?

I am a huge proponent of leasing horses, but many times it’s better to buy one instead! There are several questions you must answer to determine whether purchasing or leasing is the right option for you. Your trainer will have to help you answer many of them.

The most important piece of information to keep at the forefront of your mind is that finding the right match is crucial. Sometimes, the right horse is simply too expensive to buy, and sometimes it’s just not for sale. Other times, you may find the one you want is only for sale, when your  intent is just to lease. Whether a lease or purchase is available, be sure to do whatever is necessary for you to ride the perfect horse for you. 

How many months or years will the rider benefit from this particular horse?

When I come across a horse or pony that’s a match for my student, and that I anticipate my student will have for several years, I recommend purchasing. It’s wonderful when a horse and rider can enjoy a long relationship with each other. Each time riders change to different horses, they have to learn those horses’ habits, and personalities.

Is the rider still growing taller, and if so how quickly?

If a student comes to my barn who is capable of moving into the short stirrup ring in the near future, and she or he is small enough to stay on a pony for several years, then I may recommend purchasing a pony that is calm enough to help build confidence in the short stirrup ring, and athletic enough to take the child through the levels of the pony divisions. This isn’t easy to find, so if I can find one within the client’s budget that has all of the criteria we are seeking, then in this case it would be sensible to buy. 


Are you an adult who wants to enjoy staying near the same level for years, and wants a horse to love?

Many adults who come into my program have riding goals that make it more practical to buy than lease. Often, they want to ride near the same level, and simply enjoy those levels for years. They don’t have to worry about growing out of their horses in regard to height or ability, so in these cases, it makes a lot of sense to purchase what will become your next best friend.


What are your riding goals, and will the available budget allow the rider to purchase the appropriate horse?

If you’re ready to step into the 3′ ring with the goal of moving up within a year or two to the 3’6″ ring, and you’re a confident rider who can handle a powerful horse, and you can afford the price tag on a made 3’6″ horse that will help you to accomplish this goal, than buying a horse is ideal. 
Are you interested in an investment horse with the potential for a better return than a real estate investment?

Many of my clients have decided to buy horses that I import for them with dual purposes in mind. One being that they want talented horses they can ride to accomplish their goals, and the other being that they want to buy them for less money as young, green horses with the intent of selling them in a few years as older, made horses for more money. These clients are enjoying their horses, while at the same time viewing them as investments. 

Horses have the potential to be very successful investments, and my experience has shown that they can pay off better than real estate investments. You can think of them similarly to that of a higher risk stock that you would buy low with the intention of selling high, with significant risks and the potential for significant profit. The main difference is that whether you turn a profit or not, you’ll get to enjoy your horse along the way. 

Please feel free to visit FortitudeFarm.com or contact us at Fortitudefarm@gmail.com for more info.

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